Show Highlights

  • Free and Reduced Lunch programs while schools are closed
  • Opportunities for mobile hotspots for limited income families
  • Technology hardware options for families in need
  • Transitioning to online learning
  • An opportunity for change

Sheldon Eakins:

Hey advocates, Dr. Eakins here. How are you doing right now, with everything that we have going on with this pandemic? This coronavirus is out there, schools are closing. How are you taking care of yourself and your family? What type of self care practices are out there? Most of our schools are closed. I'm not sure if there are schools that are still open, but I'm sure many of our schools are closed, and that's a global thing.

Sheldon Eakins:

I didn't want to leave you hanging. I have two episodes, two bonus episodes, that are going to be ... Today and tomorrow I'm going to push out two episodes. For today's episode I talk with Evan Whitehead. It's funny, because him and I initially were going to talk about something totally different, but as we did our little pre-chat and we were talking about what's going on, and we're like, "Why don't we just hit record now? Let's talk about what we're talking about now so that we can share this with others." We felt that that was important.

Sheldon Eakins:

That's what we're going to be talking about today, is ... We can look at it from some opportunities. With us moving into online, not only is equity, these conversations, starting to really pop up, because now we have to talk about digital literacy and the digital divide, and access, and opportunities to internet, and services and support to our students with IEPs and 504s. These conversations are starting to happen now, and there's some opportunities for change. We're going to be talking about that today in this episode.

Sheldon Eakins:

Mr. Evan Whitehead has been in the field of education for more than 20 years, spanning three decades, and is currently the director of special services for a PK-8 school district in Illinois. In his current role, Evan oversees all federal programs, special education, McKinney Vento, English learners, and Title I. Early childhood education, multi-tiered systems of support, social-emotional learning, family and community engagement, health services, continuous improvement, and equity, diversity, and cultural competency.

Sheldon Eakins:

This message is brought to you by the Leading Equity Center. There's a free course that will be available on March the 20th, that's Friday, March the 20th. I got my good friend [Marcus Boarders 00:00:02:12] who ... Oh, my goodness, he has a wealth of knowledge. He's an instructional technologist out of Kennesaw State University. He broke down from start to finish how to set up an equitable online class that supports all students and help all students thrive during these times.

Sheldon Eakins:

Again, Friday, March 20th, you can sign up, leadingequitycenter.com/remotelearning. That course will be available for you for free. I didn't want to leave you hanging, and I want to provide support for you because ultimately that supports our students. That's what is most important to me. Head on over there, leadingequitycenter.com/remotelearning.

Sheldon Eakins:

Now from my conversation with Mr. Evan Whitehead.

Sheldon Eakins:

Welcome, advocates, to another episode of the Leading Equity Podcast, a podcast that focuses on supporting educators with the tools and resources necessary to ensure equity at their school. We're going to be talking about digital equity today.

Sheldon Eakins:

I have a very special guest with me, Mr. Evan Whitehead. Him and I are going to be chatting today. This is not a Coronavirus 101 type of episode. This is an episode that just talks about ... A lot of our schools are closing. This is a special bonus episode. It's not part of my regularly scheduled Monday episodes. I've had several folks reach out to me that were looking for some digital resources, some things to do to get them help with setting their classes online, and continue to provide support for our students.

Sheldon Eakins:

Evan and I initially were going to talk about MTSS, multi-tiered systems of support. However, as we talked before we started hitting record, we were talking about what's going on with this pandemic. We said, "Let's talk about some ed tech stuff." Neither of us are considered experts in that field, but it's something that we think is important.

Sheldon Eakins:

Without further ado, Evan, thank you so much for joining us today.

Evan Whitehead:

Thanks for having me on, brother. I appreciate it.

Sheldon Eakins:

My pleasure. Before we get into today's topic, I would love for you to share with our fellow advocates out there a little bit about you and your current professional role.

Evan Whitehead:

Thank you. I've been in the field of education for a little over 22 years now. I started as a special education teacher assistant in a therapeutic day school along with the crisis interventionist in terms of students that had an emotional or behavior disorder. I provided support in the area of social-emotional behavior support, also deescalation, and really working one-on-one with students to help them manage and to self regulate when they needed it.

Evan Whitehead:

Most recently I've been doing a lot of work in terms of consulting on a national level. I'm a national consultant and presenter for the aha! Process, which is founded and led by Dr. Ruby Payne and her famous book, Framework for Understanding Poverty. I provide support to districts and administrators, and provide training in that area.

Evan Whitehead:

Her newest book and training that that I provide certification in is Emotional Poverty and All Demographics: How to Reduce Anger, Anxiety and Violence in the Classroom. It really talks about social-emotional components and experiences, and bonding and attachment styles that shape us when we're young and how that carries over to adulthood.

Evan Whitehead:

What I like most about this work that I'm doing now is that it just doesn't focus on kids, but it also focuses on adults, and focuses on how our experiences shape and form how we interact with others and also how we interact with our students. I'm glad to be on the show. Appreciate it.

Sheldon Eakins:

Yeah, the pleasure is all mine. Sound like you have an extensive background when it comes to your professional career in education. We appreciate the work that you're doing, the work that you have done, as well. I want to jump in with discussing ... I was doing a little bit of research. A lot of us probably are glued to the TV, as I am.

Sheldon Eakins:

One of the things with a lot of our schools that are closing is the challenges that we have with the free and reduced lunch programs that are impacting a lot of our students. I work at a school that is 100%. That's a conversation that's going around. It's like, "Okay, what do we do for students who depend on breakfast and lunch from our schools?" In addition to maybe not having internet access at home and being able to do their schoolwork. What are the options out there? What some of the things in your area that you're experiencing? Are you seeing some of those similar conversations happening?

Evan Whitehead:

Yes. I'm glad you touched on that, because it really hits home as we talk about equity, what people need and what students need versus what's equal. A lot of the schools in my area, including my own, have high levels of free and reduced lunch. We provide breakfast and lunch for all of our students at no cost.

Evan Whitehead:

Sometimes we forget, the collective we, I should say, that that's a consistent meal. That's consistent for a lot of young people. As we were all thinking about what could be or what may happen, and now what has happened, I think we were focused so much on the academic component we forgot about what you said, some of those Maslow needs.

Evan Whitehead:

For us along with some of the other schools in our area and districts, we will be providing a free lunch on a grab-and-go situation. I don't know if some of the other districts or some of your listeners are thinking about this as well, but for most of the districts like us, if you are already in a lunch program, the funding and resources already allocated. It's not something extra in terms of you have to go out and buy something, it's just changing the menu. Now the menu may not be hot meals. However, providing a sack lunch, that has the appropriate nutrition ingredients that students are getting what they need, is important.

Evan Whitehead:

We're setting up similar, almost like a drive through, for lack of a better term, where families and parents can come. We're going to have free prepared meals, and we'll be giving those out daily from the lunch hours of 11:00 to 12:00. This is open to all of our students.

Evan Whitehead:

Including for the students that are McKinney-Vento homeless students, who typically do not live in our area anymore but are taking cabs, we are paying for the cabs to go pick the children up and their families to come to school for this hour, or 20 minutes, whatever it is, to pick up their lunch, and for them to go back home, because we want to eliminate all barriers for this. I think that, as we talk about the academic piece, this is where the other social-emotional equity portion comes in, and truly thinking about all of our students' needs.

Evan Whitehead:

Similar with internet access. It's great that we're all talking about E-learning plans and distance learning. But, once again, we have to always be mindful that that's still a barrier. That it shouldn't be, but the reality is that having a device or having internet access is a luxury. Depending on where you are geographically, that is very challenging. For those that live in rural areas, having internet access is not as easy as you may think it is.

Evan Whitehead:

What are we doing to provide that? I know our local library will be providing internet access.

Sheldon Eakins:

Good.

Evan Whitehead:

We also, for the students that are McKinney-Vento homeless, we are sending them a hotspot that we have from a local cable provider so that they can have access to be able to utilize their device.

Sheldon Eakins:

Can I ... I'm sorry.

Evan Whitehead:

Sure.

Sheldon Eakins:

How'd you get that set up, as far as the ... I just want to ... We have folks listening, I know they're probably thinking, "Okay, that sounds like a great idea. Didn't think about it." Can you step us through how that got set up?

Evan Whitehead:

Yeah. I sure can. If folks are not familiar, many of the cable providers have options for low-income families. They collaborate with schools. What you can do is contact your local cable provider, and ask them what options do they have for low-income families in terms of internet access? For the most part, the majority of them, is free or next to nothing. We're talking about cents, pennies, for that service, but typically it's free because those corporations understand they also have a social responsibility, and part of giving back. It's just a matter of calling them up and finding out.

Evan Whitehead:

Also I would say, for those of you out there listening, contact and speak to your technology director, director of technology. They usually have access to that, and they would know. A lot of times, if you are familiar with what is called E-Rate, the E-Rate, that provides a lot of the funding sources at a federal level to supplement a lot of your infrastructure in terms of technology. Also wifi. It can help pay for a lot of those things. There are opportunities in which you can purchase additional devices or things of that nature so you have them in times like this, where you have families that have certain needs.

Evan Whitehead:

Even to go a step further, Sheldon, I will tell you that, if you are a school-wide Title I school, you can utilize Title I funding to purchase those devices, purchase hardware as well, specifically if you're not one-to-one. We're fortunate to be one-to-one. A lot of that work, we're one-to-one because we have utilized a lot of our Title I funding. But, if you're not, you can purchase supplemental devices, or additional devices, or those hotspots as well through Title I so that everyone, all your students, have access.

Evan Whitehead:

We do that specifically for our McKinney-Vento population as well that may not have that. We make sure that they have devices, we make sure that they have those hot spots, and it's purchased out of a combination of our Title I set asides for McKinney-Vento homeless, and also since we're Title I, school wide we're able to do that as well.

Sheldon Eakins:

Okay. Thank you. You mentioned in your area the local library is offering wifi service. Also you were able to support getting the hotspots from your local cable internet service providers out there. That can possibly take care of a lot of our internet services. You alluded to the devices. Maybe Chromebooks, iPads, the actual hardware that the students can utilize at home for their support. What about maybe even headsets if they need to do some Zoom type of instruction, some sort of classroom engagement? Are you seeing any of those kinds of things being supported for our students?

Evan Whitehead:

Yeah. That's part of our hardware package. We think about all those components. Students are provided at the beginning of the year one pair of headsets. But, we also will give a replacement pair as well free. No charge. Free of cost.

Sheldon Eakins:

Good.

Evan Whitehead:

I think that being creative with this and the way that we look at and utilize our funding from an equity perspective, we always want to make sure that we're thinking about all the barriers that could come into play in terms of learning.

Evan Whitehead:

Unfortunately, we just happen to be in this state right now, but I'm very fortunate and blessed that the way that we think in terms of my current district and also some of the surrounding districts, it's always on our forefront, because we do realize that oftentimes the students and families that we serve may come from different backgrounds than those of us that are working in the district. We want to be mindful of that. We always make sure we provide that complete package.

Evan Whitehead:

We don't penalize. Things happen. Headphones can get lost, or things get broken. It just happens. We make sure that we provide that, and we make sure that we do the funding for that. If we don't have ... For example, if students move in new, you can't anticipate if you're going to get new students in. Or especially with students that are McKinney-Vento homeless, we make sure that we have the funding that's already set aside so we can purchase those things for them when they need it.

Sheldon Eakins:

Yeah, I love that.

Sheldon Eakins:

Okay. I'm assuming we got a lot of folks that are like, "Okay, there's some good stuff here." Evan, I definitely appreciate, first of all, your flexibility with changing our initial topic that we were going to talk about.

Evan Whitehead:

No worries.

Sheldon Eakins:

And for being able to, off the cuff, be able to provide these things. Thank you so much for that.

Sheldon Eakins:

Now let's talk about it from the instruction side of things. What are some of your thoughts when it comes to ... Let's say there's people that aren't as tech savvy that are now called to create lessons within maybe a matter of days, a week or two, as a lot of schools are transitioning to online services. What are some of your initial thoughts with some things that we need to be considering as we're making these transitions?

Evan Whitehead:

I do have to say this, even though I know it may not be a popular thought. Think about this. Is that, we had a lot of these resources right at our fingertips. But, from my experience, and from my observations, and also conversations, is that we have not benefited or fully utilized these devices to their full potential.

Evan Whitehead:

I mean this in this way. We have many organizations, school districts, et cetera, that are either one-to-one or close to one-to-one. Or we have access to these devices during the school day, so that students may not take them home, but they still have access to them. But, how deep do we really go in terms of the hardware and the software that we purchase? How in depth do we go into that? Because there's a lot of capability.

Evan Whitehead:

But, the challenge now is, as you alluded to, is that folks may not be that tech savvy. But, as an educational system, those of us that are either in leadership roles or whatever role we are in terms of stakeholders, there was an opportunity for us to take advantage of the technology in the space that we had. From either a learning perspective, and could we have tapped into even the students with this?

Evan Whitehead:

Because our instructional practices, for the most part, are behind the curve. Our students are actually leading it in their day-to-day work, in their day-to-day life experiences. That is their world. But, for a lot of us, the majority of us that are adults, we pushed back on a lot of that. We had an opportunity to do this, and we didn't.

Evan Whitehead:

I only speak to this is because, moving forward, this is a great opportunity for us to reflect, and also an opportunity for us as adults to use this as a learning opportunity to push our boundaries. Push ourselves a little bit, because now we can play around with the hardware and software that we have. We can dig deeper into it.

Evan Whitehead:

There are basic things that we can do. For example, you and I were talking a little bit about our technology proficiency, for lack of a better term, and talking about where we really are, even though you and I grew up when personal computers were around. But, really, the level to where they are now, the mobile devices is what the students and our children, that's what they live off of. This is their world.

Evan Whitehead:

As adults we have a great opportunity now to play around, to learn, to experiment. What's the worst thing that could happen right now? We have these great devices. Now we can learn to work with basic things like Zoom. We can have that built in. We can work with that. We can have opportunities in which we can do flipped lesson plans. We can even record ourselves on YouTube, upload it, then have the students go at it and then provide responses.

Evan Whitehead:

There are simple things that ... We can even do it from our phone. Everyone knows how to video record from our phones now. It's very simple. It doesn't have to be the most technical thing in the world. The whole point is that you want to be able to provide an opportunity in which you are helping the students facilitate their learning.

Evan Whitehead:

This goes back to, what is the focus of instruction right now? What are instructional practices? What is the role of the teacher? The role of the teacher, in my opinion, has changed, and will continue to evolve. The role of the teacher is to facilitate learning and allow students to have the autonomy to experiment, to practice, to learn from each other, and learn by trial and error, and working towards that. Those are also skills, social-emotional skills, that are very important. I think this is a great time for the adults to show their vulnerability, for the adults to even ask their students, "What's an easy way to learn?"

Evan Whitehead:

I have children that are in middle school and high school age. The first thing I did when I knew this was coming, I asked them ... I'm very direct. "What do you think about the possibly of this happening? What can we do to help?"

Evan Whitehead:

Two answers I got, one answer was, "It's about time. Why can't we do this anyway?" Brilliant thought. Why is it that we have to still confine ourselves to thinking that all the learning has to go within four walls, and sitting at a desk in front of people? You have these devices. Are we utilizing it to the full potential?

Evan Whitehead:

The second is, what about the fact that we know, if we give any child any type of mobile device, they will figure out how to navigate that within the first 30 minutes? Regardless of what age, they'll figure it out. Why? Because they just try it, and they're unafraid to take those chances and take those risks. This is the time as educators we can do that.

Evan Whitehead:

I say, just, that I want us as educators to take risks. You know what? Maybe you're not the most tech savvy person, but, so what? Try something. Just record yourself doing a lesson, even if it's very fundamental and you're taking pictures of a video of a worksheet, or whatever it is, and you're walking them through it and video recording yourself, and then you're sending it out to your students. You can email them, you can uphold the video. Those are pretty simple things that you can follow along with your people.

Evan Whitehead:

Just try it, because this could open up a totally new world in a way that you can connect with your students and begin to close that gap, that generational, cultural gap, and say, "You know what? Learning goes both ways. It's not just me as the adult teaching the student, we can learn from our students as well." This is an opportune time.

Sheldon Eakins:

I totally agree with that, Evan. There's a lot of folks that ... Shoot, I was just having a conversation with someone yesterday about his district going into the online setting. He was on the fence. He was like, "I have my reservations with online learning."

Sheldon Eakins:

I know there's a lot of us that have ... Not me particularly, but there's a lot of educators who have these reservations with online learning. "It's not as good as brick and mortar schools," and "The social aspect of things." "It's questionable." Honestly, some of those folks have not even experienced online learning. They have no actual base to ... It's just more of a, "This is what I heard," or, "This is what I suspect."

Sheldon Eakins:

I think that, I agree, this is a good opportunity for us, like you said, to get out of our comfort zone. Because some of us that's been teaching for more than four years have our rhythm. This may disrupt that rhythm. It may also bring to light some opportunities down the road for innovation on how we can ... Once all this stuff passes over, this pandemic passes over, this could lead to some serious discussions regarding how we could really ... Like, "The kids enjoyed this. We spent," I don't know, "six weeks on online learning, and it was some of the most engaged classroom students that we've had, ever."

Sheldon Eakins:

These discussions will come up. I agree. This is a great time. I just think that if we go in all out and just say, "You know what?" Tell our students, "Look, I'm trying to figure this out. Bear with me," and who knows what things we'll see that will come out of this.

Evan Whitehead:

We talk so much about being models, and modeling for our students, but this is such an organic opportunity to truly do that. I truly believe that this can be a great learning opportunity, but also a great opportunity to self-reflect in terms of our purpose in terms of educators. What that means, and now really thinking about everything with an equity focus. Because, now, equity is going to take another shape. It's going to have another meeting that's going to be real to a lot of people, because now a lot of the things that we took for granted, we can no longer take for granted anymore.

Evan Whitehead:

This equity piece now speaks to, as we were talking about, the adults. Now, as adults, we have to be open to learn about things from our students and young people that we're not used to doing. We need to figure out, what do we need? It's not like everything's fair.

Evan Whitehead:

Now, as educators, we've got to figure out, "Okay, man, I really need to know this. I have a deficit in this area. I need the playing field to be level. In order to do that, I have some gaps in my skillset, but it's not going to hold me back. I just need an opportunity to level things out. Where am I going to get that from? Am I going to take this opportunity and advantage to grow and to learn, and be okay with taking those risks to do that?" I think, if we truly take this opportunity for what it is ...

Evan Whitehead:

I know that some people are probably listening saying, "Evan, what are you talking about? This is one of the worst things that ever happened." But, think about this, though. If we're looking to tie in MTSS, what we were going to talk about, multi-tiered systems of support, you talk about your three tiers. Tier one is your core instruction. Tier two is supplemental instruction for about 10% to 15% of your students. Then that tier three is that 1% to 5% that need a lot of additional support, wraparound services support. You're looking at it from, one side of that pyramid being academic, the other being social-emotional.

Evan Whitehead:

But, if you think about that, at every level, especially at the tier one level, that's what we expect all of our students, all of our teachers, our educators, and all of our families. This is what the projection of the perfect profile would be, and this is what everyone needs.

Evan Whitehead:

When you think about that from a technical perspective, we know we have standards in terms of academic standards, for ELA, mathematics, science, et cetera. Talking about it from the social-emotional behavior piece, there are social-emotional competencies. We're fortunate enough in Illinois that we have social-emotional learning standards, and have for almost two decades.

Evan Whitehead:

But, pardon me, as you think about that, how is it that, now as we begin to grow, those two pieces really merge now? Because, as we're talking about the technical aspect of, "We have to get the content to the students," there's this other now underlying social-emotional component that's coming in because sometimes there's panic that's going on right now. There's some angst. There's some fear of the unknown.

Evan Whitehead:

Then, now that we go into a voluntary or involuntary social distancing or isolation, that means a lot, because there's some people that survive on being able to connect with others face to face. Now it's like, "How do we have those ... " Those are skillsets that we can take an opportunity to build within our students that carry over. They are so important, now more than ever.

Evan Whitehead:

As we talk about the MTSS from an equity standpoint, it really is providing what students, staff, and parents and families need from the academic, content-areas-specific, and also from the social-emotional component. There's a marriage, so to speak, of the two of those, because now you need both skills. We need both skills to be successful.

Evan Whitehead:

For those of you out there that have been doing that, I applaud you. For those of you that have been champions for social-emotional learning and champions for equity, I applaud you. For those of you that have been on the fence, I encourage you now to take that leap and think about it. For those that may have thought, "No, there's no way. I don't want to think about it from that way," or think that you have all the answers, this is a great time.

Evan Whitehead:

A great time for learning, and a great time to think about truly what we call the "whole child" approach. This is when it comes into play, and making sure that it's not about what they should be getting or what's fair, but what's needed for them to be successful.

Sheldon Eakins:

You've raised up so many great points, especially as we're thinking about online education and social-emotional learning skills. What, 20 years? Who knows? 10, 15 years from now, a lot of meetings, a lot of interaction, engagement, might be online.

Sheldon Eakins:

Having some of those foundational skills, social-emotional, learning-based skills when it comes to interaction, social development, and collaboration, project-based learning type of things that we're teaching our students now, but we're typically teaching them face to face situations, and how we can transition those skills online, because it's where a lot of things are going. As we talked about earlier, you give a child a device, and they can whip around that device without any issue. That's not something that we need to ...

Sheldon Eakins:

If I was building a class for my students, if I had to transition everything online, I would want to make sure that that SEL is there, that they are interacting with each other. It's not just a, "Make your post, and then comment on two." It's not one of those things, but it's some actual interaction that's engaging between each other.

Evan Whitehead:

Yes. I agree. To personalize this for your listeners for a little bit, if you think about just us, and the two of us in particular, we've never met face to face.

Sheldon Eakins:

Nope.

Evan Whitehead:

Right? Never met face to face. Just so everyone knows. We just spoke for the first time in terms of at length or a little bit at length simultaneously. We did speak on Voxer back and forth, but that's not simultaneous, necessarily, interaction. But, had you and I not had some of those social-emotional skills to do that, we could never go from a conversation on Twitter or a follow on Twitter to a product right now.

Evan Whitehead:

If we think about the steps that that took, not so much the technical steps, but the ability to understand about ... Okay, we're both working. We both have family responsibilities. We both have things that come up just in life. But, to be able to still start at one point and finish with an end product, that takes certain social-emotional understanding components, and to do it virtually.

Evan Whitehead:

It can happen. To think that it has to be cold and sterile just because you're physically not in front of someone, that's not true. The skills of social-emotional learning are applicable to all types of learning. It's just understanding how that fits, and us also making sure that we have the common language and we are able to facilitate that so it fits.

Sheldon Eakins:

I love it. Evan, you have provided ... This has been really fun. I have enjoyed our conversation today, and I'm so thankful that you're here. I consider you as providing a voice in leading equity. Could you share with us, what is one final word of advice that you could share with our listeners?

Evan Whitehead:

Sure. I would just like to say that ... Remember that we're all connected at some form or fashion. We're all interconnected. Based on the current set of events, it's even more real. That we need to understand that all have strengths. We all have challenges. We all have things that we can improve on, but it's about growth.

Evan Whitehead:

When it comes down to equity, having the empathy, and the love, and the understanding to know that we all have different needs. But, those needs to be met so that we can all start on the same even playing field, to at least have the same opportunities, is what's important. As we do that as educators, I just want to make sure everyone's mindful, and understand that we're here for each other. To make sure that we take advantage of this time to be better people, to grow, and to be there for others.

Sheldon Eakins:

Thank you. Let's be there for others. I think we'll end it there. If we have some folks that want to reach out to you and connect with you, what's the best way online that they can connect with you?

Evan Whitehead:

Sure. Online you can ... I'm on Twitter, @EvanWhitehead00. @EvanWhitehead, all together, 00. I'm also on Voxer thanks to Sheldon, put me on Voxer very early on. On Voxer I'm capital E, capital W, 00. Then my email address is EvanWhitehead, E-V-A-N-W-H-I-T-H-E-A-D, [email protected] evanwhitehead, the number 11, @gmail.com.

Sheldon Eakins:

There it is. I'm speaking with Mr. Evan Whitehead, and it has been a pleasure. Thank you for listening to this bonus episode of the Leading Equity Podcast. Evan, thank you again. It's been a pleasure.

Evan Whitehead:

Thanks, brother. Peace and blessings.

Sheldon Eakins:

Thank you so much for listening to this bonus episode of the Leading Equity Podcast. If you haven't subscribed to the show already, please do. Please share with your friends. Always would appreciate any sort of reviews that you can leave on Apple. That is much appreciated.

Sheldon Eakins:

Again, Friday, March 20th, there's a free course that's going to be available for you. leadingequitycenter.com/remotelearning is available for you. It's called Teaching Online, and it's all about how to create an equitable online learning classroom. Many of you are leading equity and moving it from your traditional classroom setting to an online classroom setting. I want to help you.

Sheldon Eakins:

Let's remember the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. If you can't fly, then run. If you can't run, then walk. If you can't walk, then crawl. But, by all means, keep moving. Let's continue to be a voice in leading equity.

Subscribe & Review in iTunes

Are you subscribed to the podcast? If you’re not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode. Click here to subscribe in iTunes!

Now if you enjoy listening to the show, I would be really grateful if you left me a review over on iTunes, too. Those reviews help other advocates find the podcast and they’re also fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the podcast is. Thank you!

Close

Looking to get started with developing an equitable learning environment at your school?

This FREE download will give you 10 strategies to help you develop an equity competent mindset (AND give you a shot of confidence that you can become an ADVOCATE for your students!).